Please login here to proceed
Should white people pay more for lunch? New Orleans chef tests social experiment

Posted 309 days ago | 19.03.18

  Listen to this news
  Reading this news  
Should white people pay more for lunch? New Orleans chef tests social experiment

Imagine standing in a line for lunch. The customer in front you pays $12 for his food box but when you go to pay for the same product, the chef asks if you’re willing to shell out $30 instead.

Why? Because you’re white.

Would you pay?

That was the premise of a social experiment mounted by New Orleans chef Tunde Wey in February. Much to his own surprise, the answer was, for the most part, yes.

Nearly 80% of white customers agreed to pay the inflated price for a pre-fixed Nigerian food box lunch at Wey’s Saartje food stand – after he explained that the request was meant to shine a light on New Orleans’ dramatic and widening income gap.

“I wasn’t expecting it,” Wey said. “What was happening at the stall is that I represented a consequence – this personification of accountability.”

Median net income for white families in New Orleans is more than $63,000. For black families, it is just below $26,000. Wey’s $18 food price gap was intended to approximate this earnings gap, which has been growing since cataclysmic flooding after Hurricane Katrina in 2005 radically reshaped the city.

“First I introduce the facts and as a white person, you are now an antagonist in this framework,” Wey said. “But I offer you an easy out. You can pay $12 or you can pay $30. What are you going to do?”

Wey offered to redistribute the extra money back to black patrons, the majority of whom did not take him up on the offer. Some, he said, asked if they could pay $30 too.

To view the original story please visit  >    Should white people pay more for lunch? New Orleans chef tests social experiment

To contribute articles, please set up an account for yourself here!  




Choose preferred language